Helping families make the most of personality differences.
Blog
What is Personality Type?
Learn Your Child's Type View Learn Your Child's Type Submenu Items
Learn Your Type View Learn Your Type Submenu Items
Resources for Parents
Type Tips from the Experts
 
MMTIC® Certification View MMTIC<sup>®</sup> Certification Submenu Items
MMTIC® Assessment View MMTIC<sup>®</sup> Assessment Submenu Items
Advantages
Resources View Resources Submenu Items
Mother and daughter understanding the type differences of how they manage time

Personality Type and Social Emotional Learning: Self-Management (SEL Series – Part 3)

Apr 04, 2022
Yvonne Nelson-Reid, PhD
YVONNE NELSON-REID, PhD, is the Senior Development Associate at the Center for Applications of Psychological Type (CAPT®), the publisher for the People Stripes® website, a mother of 5, writer, teacher (BEd, MA), depth psychologist – Jungian and archetypal studies (MA, PhD), and career coach. Parenting, teaching in a classroom, or on the ice as a figure skating coach has taught her a great deal about relationships and the importance of communication.
View full author bio | Close

Yvonne Nelson-Reid is a master practitioner for the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator® (MBTI®) instrument and a practitioner for the Murphy-Meisgeier Type Indicator for Children® (MMTIC®) assessment, who has been helping individuals, families, and children understand themselves better for over 25 years. In the third article of this series, Yvonne integrates her years of experience as an educator with her expertise in personality type to explore connections between type and Social Emotional Learning (SEL). New to Type? Click here!

In part one of this series, Personality Type and Social Emotional Learning (SEL), I explained SEL as defined by the Collaborative of Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning (CASEL) organization. Furthermore, I suggested that SEL teaches an awareness of what we need to know for healthy development and learning personality type teaches how individuals go about doing so based on their natural styles. They go hand in hand. Personality type aligns with and strengthens SEL.

How does learning about personality type support the five core competencies of SEL? In part two of this series, I demonstrated the connection between type and the SEL competency of Self-Awareness. Now, I turn to Self-Management.

Self-Management

CASEL defines Self-Management as: "The abilities to manage one's emotions, thoughts, and behaviors effectively in different situations and to achieve goals and aspirations. This includes the capacities to delay gratification, manage stress, and feel motivation and agency to accomplish personal and collective goals."1

Personality type does not tell us what we will think, act, or say in any situation. We choose our behavior. According to type theory, we do not choose our strengths or stretches since these are inborn and develop over the lifespan. Type helps us to decide whether a situation calls for us to draw upon our strengths or stretches. Our personality style may be different from other people, but we can learn to appreciate those differences and, when necessary, lean into our stretch to better communicate.

When in situations that require us to go against our natural personality style, it can feel exhausting, and we may feel less capable and competent when using the opposite type preferences. This is the same for all ages but even more so for young people. In the early years, natural type preferences start to develop. For healthy development we all need a comfortable and reliable way to take in information and make decisions. We also need to learn how to engage in our outer world through Extraversion and reflect upon our inner world through Introversion, although most of us will prefer and feel more comfortable with one over the other. Young people can learn about their opposite preferences (stretches), becoming competent in their use, however, is challenging. They are still learning about themselves and developing their natural preferences (strengths).

Many people view the world through the lens of their own personality type believing that their way is the right way, or the only way of engaging with others, leading to misunderstandings and potential conflict. Learning about personality type differences allows us to see the world through multiple lenses, enabling better self-management through our emotions, thoughts, and behaviors in our relationships with others. Rather than get into an argument over differences, we can begin to appreciate those differences. However, when young people struggle to use their stretches or find themselves in prolonged situations requiring them to do so, anxiety and stress levels rise. They may feel embarrassed, incompetent, and angry. Communicating with someone who has opposite preferences may invoke frustration leading to an uncomfortable, stressful situation.

Type awareness offers a way to manage stress based upon your overall preferences, which may or may not be managed in the same way as your family, friends, and teachers. Without the words to articulate these frustrations, young people will often act out, lash out, have tantrums, or withdraw into isolation. For example, one of my daughters, who prefers ESFJ, appreciates harmony and values connection in her relationships. She is outgoing and enjoys being with and helping her friends. As a young girl, when conflict arose with friends, she would retreat to her room, isolate, and place all the blame on herself. Excessive criticism internalized, leading to depression and feelings of inadequacy, is typical for her personality type when under stress; it is the complete opposite to her usual enthusiastic and uplifting approach to life. Type awareness taught her that some alone time is good for self-nurturance but talking through these situations with a trusted impartial person really helps her to get out of her self-critical head and back into balance. Over time, she has learned that a lack of harmony is not such a bad thing, and it is not up to her to create another's happiness. Understanding how stress impacts our personality type aids in better self-management.

Another area of self-management that is supported through an understanding of personality type is goal achievement which is often dependent upon our ability to manage our time. The Judging and Perceiving preference pair describes how people manage and approach their outside world. People who prefer Judging live life in a planful and orderly way. They tend to be systematic, early starting, scheduled, and methodical. They like reaching decisions quickly, sometimes too quickly without gathering enough information. Since they often plan weeks, months, and years ahead, last minute surprises or changes can be disarming. Whereas people who prefer Perceiving live life in a spontaneous and flexible way. They often love surprises and like exploring. They tend to be casual, open-ended, adaptable, and pressure prompted. Gathering information is a priority to decision-making, sometimes gathering too much information, and never quite making it to a decision. Since they would rather experience life than control it, they are not thrown off by last minute changes and pride themselves on their resourcefulness and adaptability.

This preference pair often causes the most conflict because they just do not get each other. People often have a bias against the opposite preference seeing their way as the "right" way. This is not the case; both preferences have value. Take meeting deadlines or due dates, for example. Students will approach assignment due dates differently depending on their preference for Judging or Perceiving, as described above. Parents or teachers with opposite type preferences to the young person may feel exasperated leading to arguments and slammed doors!

Adults who prefer Judging may feel frustrated by young people with a Perceiving preference who wait until the last minute to complete tasks. Keep in mind, they are often motivated by an upcoming deadline or due date and produce their best work in a burst of energy at the eleventh hour, although they may need guidance in getting there! Young people with a Perceiving preference might feel micromanaged and constrained by adults who prefer Judging and when forced to follow someone else's timeline, may not produce their best work.

Adults who prefer Perceiving may feel frustrated by young people with a Judging preference when it comes to plans. A temper tantrum may break out if a week ago, for example, the adult suggested that a trip to the zoo would be a nice outing for the following Saturday, and on Saturday the plans shift to a trip to visit Grandma. Even though seeing Grandma would be fun, it is not the zoo as was planned because even a suggestion can be a definite plan, according to the young person with a Judging preference. They like to stick to their plans, and they expect everyone else to as well! Verbalizing their discomfort with a sudden change in plans may be challenging for them, instead they may act out or pout leaving the adult confused and agitated. Young people with a Judging preference might feel like life is chaotic when plans shift spontaneously and may need support in understanding the value in flexibility, along with an explanation, when plans do change. A little notice helps, too!

We need each other! Self-management will look different whether you prefer Judging or Perceiving. We can all meet due dates and manage life changes, but how we get there may look quite different.

These are some ways in which personality type awareness supports an understanding of Self-Management and why our individual approaches may differ. Part four of the series will focus on personality type and the SEL core competency for Responsible Decision-Making.

1. "What Is the CASEL Framework?" CASEL, October 11, 2021. https://casel.org/fundamentals-of-sel/what-is-the-casel-framework/#self-awareness.

LINK COPIED TO CLIPBOARD




Related Content



dad and young teen daughter working on a project

A Bike, a Trash Can, and a Lesson in Self-Management

Apr 03, 2018
Elizabeth Murphy, EdD
ELIZABETH MURPHY, EdD, is a psychologist and type expert whose research focuses on verifying the development of normal personality differences according to the theory of psychological type. She works extensively with families and teams of people to improve communication and resolve relationship needs.
View full author bio | Close

A father was taking his young daughter on a ride using her brand-new bike with training wheels. I watched the little girl riding on the sidewalk. The father was running ahead moving any trashcan that was in the way or little twigs that might be a bump for her. Basically, he was doing his best to make it a perfectly fine path for the child to ride.

READ MORE >>





two little girls fighting and yelling

The Challenge to Win Fairly and Lose Friendly

May 30, 2018
Elizabeth Murphy, EdD
ELIZABETH MURPHY, EdD, is a psychologist and type expert whose research focuses on verifying the development of normal personality differences according to the theory of psychological type. She works extensively with families and teams of people to improve communication and resolve relationship needs.
View full author bio | Close

All children in elementary schools have to learn how to “win fairly and lose friendly.” The task is harder for some children than it is for others. To learn the lesson, beginning in preschool, there should be moments for winning and moments for losing. When teachers try to create an environment where “everyone wins,” children lose the opportunity to learn this skill.

READ MORE >>





teen girl in pajamas, brushing teeth, taking selfie in bed

Monday Selfies: Telling Children They are Wonderful without Teaching Them How to Become Wonderful is Unfair

Jun 21, 2018
Elizabeth Murphy, EdD
ELIZABETH MURPHY, EdD, is a psychologist and type expert whose research focuses on verifying the development of normal personality differences according to the theory of psychological type. She works extensively with families and teams of people to improve communication and resolve relationship needs.
View full author bio | Close

We tell children so often that they are wonderful just being who they are but they don?t always feel wonderful. Many worry greatly about how others perceive them and do not have a sense of what others see.

Some children focus only on their flaws. Others notice only their strengths. Development means we all have moments when our way is a perfect match for the situation. Then there are the times when our way does not work well for the task at hand and we must accommodate.

READ MORE >>





girl child looking at dresses hanging in a closet

Using Choices to Increase Individuality

Jul 18, 2018
Elizabeth Murphy, EdD
ELIZABETH MURPHY, EdD, is a psychologist and type expert whose research focuses on verifying the development of normal personality differences according to the theory of psychological type. She works extensively with families and teams of people to improve communication and resolve relationship needs.
View full author bio | Close

Teachers and parents often agree that individuality should be encouraged in the home and in the classroom, but sometimes we hear comments from teachers that sound like this: "How am I supposed to do that when there are more than 30 students in the class?"

READ MORE >>





teacher with hand on hip and pointer stick pointing to teen boy in classroom

“My Teacher Hates Me! I Hate My Teacher!” – The Joys of a New School Year

Aug 07, 2018
Yvonne Nelson-Reid, PhD
YVONNE NELSON-REID, PhD, is the Senior Development Associate at the Center for Applications of Psychological Type (CAPT®), the publisher for the People Stripes® website, a mother of 5, writer, teacher (BEd, MA), depth psychologist – Jungian and archetypal studies (MA, PhD), and career coach. Parenting, teaching in a classroom, or on the ice as a figure skating coach has taught her a great deal about relationships and the importance of communication.
View full author bio | Close

Getting ready to meet the new teacher can add to the stress of the new year. Learning how to work through difficult situations is an important life skill, especially for young people.

READ MORE >>





teacher and young students around a table looking at tablets

Learning Styles – Meeting the Needs of the Student

Aug 13, 2018
Yvonne Nelson-Reid, PhD
YVONNE NELSON-REID, PhD, is the Senior Development Associate at the Center for Applications of Psychological Type (CAPT®), the publisher for the People Stripes® website, a mother of 5, writer, teacher (BEd, MA), depth psychologist – Jungian and archetypal studies (MA, PhD), and career coach. Parenting, teaching in a classroom, or on the ice as a figure skating coach has taught her a great deal about relationships and the importance of communication.
View full author bio | Close

Time management is a big deal in school, especially considering the incredibly busy lives so many of our kids lead. Clearly, some kids like structure, using a planner to organize their daily activities and homework assignments, and we know many who don't. Teaching kids in a way that honors their different learning styles can help everyone succeed.

READ MORE >>





kneeling mother holding finger up to little, pouting girl in front of candy shelves in a store

The Delicate Balance Between Compliance and Development

Aug 28, 2018
Elizabeth Murphy, EdD
ELIZABETH MURPHY, EdD, is a psychologist and type expert whose research focuses on verifying the development of normal personality differences according to the theory of psychological type. She works extensively with families and teams of people to improve communication and resolve relationship needs.
View full author bio | Close

When a child makes an independent choice, development occurs. We want to give children the freedom of wise decision making, but some decisions are not theirs to make. That’s when rules apply.

READ MORE >>





woman's manicured hands writing on sticky notes

What’s Your POS (Parent Operating System)? And Where Does it Come From?

Oct 12, 2018
Mollie Allen, MEd
MOLLIE ALLEN, MEd, is a certified coach, teacher and consultant working with groups and individuals. With undergraduate degrees in Child Development and Special Education and a M.Ed. in Administration and Supervision she worked in schools and in private practice with students of all ages and levels for 25 years.
View full author bio | Close

A major challenge for some parents is learning how to support your children without forgetting about yourself. I developed habits and policies – my Parent Operating System – through experience and reflection. A foundational piece came after one “my project is due tomorrow” event.

READ MORE >>





little boy holding a broom in one hand and a quarter in the other

Help or Hire?

Oct 01, 2018
Elizabeth Murphy, EdD
ELIZABETH MURPHY, EdD, is a psychologist and type expert whose research focuses on verifying the development of normal personality differences according to the theory of psychological type. She works extensively with families and teams of people to improve communication and resolve relationship needs.
View full author bio | Close

Children love when we wait on them hand and foot. Who doesn't? Sometimes, without meaning to, we inadvertently encourage children to feign helplessness because we rush to help too soon. Here is a suggested strategy that works well for those occasions.

READ MORE >>



For Me: Type Tip #7

If you are adamant about an opinion or a procedure, add the phrase "for me" at the end so the child knows other opinions may also have value. Instead of saying, "pineapple pizza is disgusting," say "pineapple pizza is disgusting for me." That was undoubtedly your intent but the explicit phrase opens the door for the young listener to have a different opinion.

LINK COPIED TO CLIPBOARD




father lecturing his teen son

Two Worlds: Extraversion and Introversion

Jan 31, 2019
Mollie Allen, MEd
MOLLIE ALLEN, MEd, is a certified coach, teacher and consultant working with groups and individuals. With undergraduate degrees in Child Development and Special Education and a M.Ed. in Administration and Supervision she worked in schools and in private practice with students of all ages and levels for 25 years.
View full author bio | Close

Taking time to reflect before making a decision is a good skill to have. Depending on their preferences, kids may either be good at it or may not recognize the importance of that inner conversation. This People Stripes article examines the manifestations of our inward and outward energies.

READ MORE >>





angry mom and teen girl sitting at either end of couch looking away from each other

Anything You Can Do I Can Do Better

Feb 22, 2019
Yvonne Nelson-Reid, PhD
YVONNE NELSON-REID, PhD, is the Senior Development Associate at the Center for Applications of Psychological Type (CAPT®), the publisher for the People Stripes® website, a mother of 5, writer, teacher (BEd, MA), depth psychologist – Jungian and archetypal studies (MA, PhD), and career coach. Parenting, teaching in a classroom, or on the ice as a figure skating coach has taught her a great deal about relationships and the importance of communication.
View full author bio | Close

You know that feeling when you just can't finish a sentence before your friend jumps in with a better version of your story. It may not be what you think it is. This People Stripes article that offers a fresh perspective on this challenging moment.

READ MORE >>





close-up, back of sword throne from Game of Thrones

What do Game of Thrones and Type Have in Common?

Apr 26, 2019
Elizabeth Murphy, EdD
ELIZABETH MURPHY, EdD, is a psychologist and type expert whose research focuses on verifying the development of normal personality differences according to the theory of psychological type. She works extensively with families and teams of people to improve communication and resolve relationship needs.
View full author bio | Close

Characters on Game of Thrones are looking to leave a legacy, and that is a tough job for them. Luckily personality type can provide a more peaceful path towards creating a legacy that imprints a positive message on our loved ones. Elizabeth Murphy shows the way in this People Stripes article.

READ MORE >>





young man chemist pouring red liquid from one beaker to another, smiling

Preparing for the 21st Century

Jul 31, 2019
Elizabeth Murphy, EdD
ELIZABETH MURPHY, EdD, is a psychologist and type expert whose research focuses on verifying the development of normal personality differences according to the theory of psychological type. She works extensively with families and teams of people to improve communication and resolve relationship needs.
View full author bio | Close

Helping your child succeed in the 21st century calls for a new approach to the balance between specialist and generalist. Elizabeth Murphy shows us how to nurture that balance, looking through the lens of personality type.

READ MORE >>





young woman excited, eyes closed, head back and smiling big with hands in fists

Motivation Matters: Give a Moose a Muffin

Sep 12, 2019
Yvonne Nelson-Reid, PhD
YVONNE NELSON-REID, PhD, is the Senior Development Associate at the Center for Applications of Psychological Type (CAPT®), the publisher for the People Stripes® website, a mother of 5, writer, teacher (BEd, MA), depth psychologist – Jungian and archetypal studies (MA, PhD), and career coach. Parenting, teaching in a classroom, or on the ice as a figure skating coach has taught her a great deal about relationships and the importance of communication.
View full author bio | Close

Motivation matters. It is the core of our personality that motivates us, and this shines through in several different ways depending upon our personality type. See how motivation manifests itself in teens with different types.

READ MORE >>





A family managing stress during challenging times

Coping with COVID-19

Jun 01, 2020
Yvonne Nelson-Reid, PhD
YVONNE NELSON-REID, PhD, is the Senior Development Associate at the Center for Applications of Psychological Type (CAPT®), the publisher for the People Stripes® website, a mother of 5, writer, teacher (BEd, MA), depth psychologist – Jungian and archetypal studies (MA, PhD), and career coach. Parenting, teaching in a classroom, or on the ice as a figure skating coach has taught her a great deal about relationships and the importance of communication.
View full author bio | Close

Families all living at home together without a break are part of the reality of the pandemic life. Knowing about our loved one's personality type can provide insights into how stress is manifested in different ways. Accepting these differences can be a challenge - this People Stripes article gives some good tips for maintaining family equilibrium.

READ MORE >>





Siblings approaching time-management in different ways

Adapt or Manage: How Do You Approach Time?

Jun 02, 2021
Yvonne Nelson-Reid, PhD
YVONNE NELSON-REID, PhD, is the Senior Development Associate at the Center for Applications of Psychological Type (CAPT®), the publisher for the People Stripes® website, a mother of 5, writer, teacher (BEd, MA), depth psychologist – Jungian and archetypal studies (MA, PhD), and career coach. Parenting, teaching in a classroom, or on the ice as a figure skating coach has taught her a great deal about relationships and the importance of communication.
View full author bio | Close

Yvonne Nelson-Reid discusses the distinctions between preferences for Judging and Perceiving in her two youngest children, in grades 11 and 12, when they had the opportunity to take Advanced Placement Environmental Science together. The preferences indicate an important distinction in personalities, as preferences for Judging and Perceiving determine how people approach established deadlines.

READ MORE >>



Motivation and Type Behavior: Type Tip #13

When you are estimating a child's type preference don't just focus on the outer behavior but also look for the motivation for that behavior. An elementary school-aged child, who prefers FP (Feeling with Perceiving), can look and act as if they prefer J (Judging) if the child thinks that will please the parent or the teacher. For a child who prefers Introversion, their motivator is internal. We do not see it. So, a child who prefers INFP is motivated internally using F (Feeling), but we see N (iNtuition) which they use in their outer world through brainstorming with others, so they may appear to prefer Extraversion, even though their overall preference is for Introversion. 

LINK COPIED TO CLIPBOARD




Teenagers navigating the complications of high school dating

He’s So Cute! Now What? (From the Kids)

Nov 03, 2021
Yvonne Nelson-Reid, PhD
YVONNE NELSON-REID, PhD, is the Senior Development Associate at the Center for Applications of Psychological Type (CAPT®), the publisher for the People Stripes® website, a mother of 5, writer, teacher (BEd, MA), depth psychologist – Jungian and archetypal studies (MA, PhD), and career coach. Parenting, teaching in a classroom, or on the ice as a figure skating coach has taught her a great deal about relationships and the importance of communication.
View full author bio | Close

Starting with an understanding of communication styles can make a difference in all our relationships.

In this third article of "From the Kids" Series, Yvonne Nelson-Reid discusses how understanding type differences can help teenagers navigate the complications of high school dating. Her teenage daughter describes the positive impact that learning about, and appreciating, communication style differences based on personality type, had on her own relationship.

READ MORE >>





Students using their strengths and exercising their stretches to get along

Student Outcomes (Research Series – NC Part 3)

Jan 05, 2022
Kesstan Blandin, PhD
KESSTAN BLANDIN, PhD is the Vice President of Research and Development at the Center for the Applications of Psychological Type in Gainesville, FL, where she conducts research in Jungian typology and archetypes.
View full author bio | Close

This is the third, and final article of the two-year study at Combs Elementary school in Raleigh, North Carolina, where the MMTIC® instrument and system was comprehensively incorporated into the school system. In this article Kesstan Blandin highlights the education the third-grade students received on decision-making using the psychological type Z-model, and student outcomes for the study.

The seven main student outcomes were: (1) developing type awareness, (2) enhancing their self-awareness, (3) advocating for their choices, (4) challenging themselves to improve their stretches, (5) improving classroom community, (6) enhancing their self-management, and (7) promoting motivation and engagement. Three of these outcomes are discussed in more detail.

READ MORE >>



Thinking/Feeling - Both Decision Words: Type Tip #16

Those with a Thinking preference tend to hear the word "feel" as an emotion. Those with a Feeling preference hear that word as a decision, a choice. So, when I work with young children, I try to use a pair of words. Instead of saying "How do you feel about that?" I say, "What do you think or feel about that?" Children who prefer Thinking can latch onto the "think" word and children with a Feeling preference can latch onto the word "feel."


LINK COPIED TO CLIPBOARD




Teens living their best life with a healthy sense of their own identity and respect for each other

Personality Type and Social Emotional Learning (SEL Series – Part 1)

Feb 01, 2022
Yvonne Nelson-Reid, PhD
YVONNE NELSON-REID, PhD, is the Senior Development Associate at the Center for Applications of Psychological Type (CAPT®), the publisher for the People Stripes® website, a mother of 5, writer, teacher (BEd, MA), depth psychologist – Jungian and archetypal studies (MA, PhD), and career coach. Parenting, teaching in a classroom, or on the ice as a figure skating coach has taught her a great deal about relationships and the importance of communication.
View full author bio | Close

Imagine a world with well-rounded, caring, emotionally aware, and capable people living their best life with a healthy sense of their own identity and respect for others. Isn't this what we all want? In this article, the first in a series, Yvonne Nelson-Reid explores the interrelationship between personality type and the Social Emotional Learning (SEL) movement, and how that connection can benefit the healthy development of youth and adults alike.

READ MORE >>



5-Minute Warning: Type Tip #17

Use the "5-Minute Warning" to let a child know when closure to their task is imminent. "In five minutes, we will need to leave." Warning of the change in an activity is respectful to both the Judging (J) and Perceiving (P) preference. Those who prefer J are typically early starting and like to know what is coming next so they can formulate a plan. People who prefer P are often pressure-prompted and like to keep their options open, so advance notice reminds them to complete the task at hand. Time management for a J preference means following a schedule and reaching closure quickly, whereas, with a P preference, keeping options open until the last moment is optimal, producing their best work in those final minutes. 

LINK COPIED TO CLIPBOARD




Diverse teens connecting with each other using type-awareness

Personality Type and Social Emotional Learning: Self-Awareness (SEL Series – Part 2)

Mar 02, 2022
Yvonne Nelson-Reid, PhD
YVONNE NELSON-REID, PhD, is the Senior Development Associate at the Center for Applications of Psychological Type (CAPT®), the publisher for the People Stripes® website, a mother of 5, writer, teacher (BEd, MA), depth psychologist – Jungian and archetypal studies (MA, PhD), and career coach. Parenting, teaching in a classroom, or on the ice as a figure skating coach has taught her a great deal about relationships and the importance of communication.
View full author bio | Close

Knowing and understanding our strengths and stretches improves self-esteem and self-understanding. The first of the five core competencies of the Social Emotional Learning (SEL) movement is self-awareness. In this second article of the SEL series, Yvonne Nelson-Reid demonstrates how self-awareness through an understanding of type allows you to apply your strengths and reinforce your stretches.

READ MORE >>



Second Chance: Type Tip #18

Sometimes preteens, with a preference for Extraversion, say things first, before they think it through and then may feel they have to stand by what was said. The strategy of "second chance" allows an alternative. When a student said something that might be considered rude, I would say, "Second chance. Do you want to say that another way?" So often they would. If a child just wanted to be rude, they would say a second rude comment. When that happens then you know it is not Extraversion but is rudeness and you can give an appropriate consequence. 

LINK COPIED TO CLIPBOARD




Teens can use the Z-model to make better decisions

Personality Type and Social Emotional Learning: Responsible Decision-Making (SEL Series – Part 4)

May 03, 2022
Yvonne Nelson-Reid, PhD
YVONNE NELSON-REID, PhD, is the Senior Development Associate at the Center for Applications of Psychological Type (CAPT®), the publisher for the People Stripes® website, a mother of 5, writer, teacher (BEd, MA), depth psychologist – Jungian and archetypal studies (MA, PhD), and career coach. Parenting, teaching in a classroom, or on the ice as a figure skating coach has taught her a great deal about relationships and the importance of communication.
View full author bio | Close

In this fourth article of the Social Emotional Learning (SEL) series, Yvonne Nelson-Reid presents how to approach the SEL core competency of Responsible Decision-Making by using the Zig-Zag Process™ (Z-model). The Z-model introduces a balanced method for decision-making by using all four mental processes of Sensing, Intuition, Thinking, and Feeling to allow for clearer perceptions and sounder judgments.

READ MORE >>



Making a Choice: Type Tip #20

Give CHOICES, CHOICES, CHOICES. Every time a child makes an independent choice, they choose a way to process the options and make a selection. This action allows for type exploration and type development. Even infants and toddlers can make choices. With toddlers, instead of the command, "Sit here" say, "Which chair would you like to use?" We may not know the basis for the choice but reaching a decision would require taking in information and making a choice, resulting in personal development. 

LINK COPIED TO CLIPBOARD




Mother and teen daughter with type differences in conflict

Personality Type and Social Emotional Learning: Relationship Skills (SEL Series – Part 5)

May 26, 2022
Yvonne Nelson-Reid, PhD
YVONNE NELSON-REID, PhD, is the Senior Development Associate at the Center for Applications of Psychological Type (CAPT®), the publisher for the People Stripes® website, a mother of 5, writer, teacher (BEd, MA), depth psychologist – Jungian and archetypal studies (MA, PhD), and career coach. Parenting, teaching in a classroom, or on the ice as a figure skating coach has taught her a great deal about relationships and the importance of communication.
View full author bio | Close

Communication and active listening are essential skills towards building healthy relationships. In this fifth article, of the Social Emotional Learning (SEL) series, this month concentrating on Relationship Skills, Yvonne Nelson-Reid describes how best we can communicate with others using their type language by stretching into our own opposite preference.

READ MORE >>



Type and Decision-Making: Type Tip #21

Use the Z-model of decision-making with children just as you do with adults. Before bringing closure to a decision, they should answer four key questions.  

  1. Do we have all the information we need? (Sensing)  
  2. Should we consider other possibilities? (Intuition)  
  3. Is this reasonable? Can we really do it? (Thinking)  
  4. Is this important? Is it worth my time? (Feeling) 

They may need help answering the questions but asking the questions prepares them to look at an issue from a variety of perspectives. These four questions are only an example. Many others could be used. 


LINK COPIED TO CLIPBOARD




A diverse group of students, working together, can develop empathy and appreciation for differences and similarities.

Personality Type and Social Emotional Learning: Social Awareness (SEL Series – Part 6)

Jul 05, 2022
Yvonne Nelson-Reid, PhD
YVONNE NELSON-REID, PhD, is the Senior Development Associate at the Center for Applications of Psychological Type (CAPT®), the publisher for the People Stripes® website, a mother of 5, writer, teacher (BEd, MA), depth psychologist – Jungian and archetypal studies (MA, PhD), and career coach. Parenting, teaching in a classroom, or on the ice as a figure skating coach has taught her a great deal about relationships and the importance of communication.
View full author bio | Close

In the sixth article of the series, Personality Type and Social Emotional Learning, Yvonne Nelson-Reid highlights how Social Awareness, along with an understanding and appreciation of type differences, can make way for the constructive use of these differences. Differences often drive us apart, but valuing these differences can unite us and instill greater compassion and empathy for others.

READ MORE >>



Judging Preference Play-time: Type Tip #22

Young people who prefer Judging enjoy play and spontaneity so long as these activities do not distract them from finishing a task they are working to complete. They tend to hurry to finish homework right away not because they are more "responsible" but because they cannot relax and enjoy the play if there is work to be done. They say, "I do my homework right away so I can have more time to play." 

LINK COPIED TO CLIPBOARD