Helping families make the most of personality differences.
Blog
What is Personality Type?
Learn Your Child's Type View Learn Your Child's Type Submenu Items
Learn Your Type View Learn Your Type Submenu Items
Resources for Parents
Type Tips from the Experts
 
MMTIC® Certification View MMTIC<sup>®</sup> Certification Submenu Items
MMTIC® Assessment View MMTIC<sup>®</sup> Assessment Submenu Items
Advantages
Resources View Resources Submenu Items

5 Results tagged "Class-Participation"

Sensing Learners: Type Tip #8

Young Sensing learners typically enjoy multiple examples to prove a point or solidify a concept. The multiple examples are not so much for comprehension as they are for confirmation. They may have understood what was taught the first time but the additional examples confirm that they understood accurately. Teachers can tell their class that some students like only one or two examples and others like more, even 5 or 6 examples. If they only like a few examples they can appreciate that the additional examples are for friends in the class. Our experience is that most students do not mind if they know the reason for the additional examples. Otherwise they assume others are like them and ready to move on or even are bored by the repeating examples.

LINK COPIED TO CLIPBOARD


Learning Styles

Learning Styles – Meeting the Needs of the Student

Aug 13, 2018
Yvonne Nelson-Reid, PhD
YVONNE NELSON-REID, PhD, is the Senior Development Associate at the Center for Applications of Psychological Type (CAPT®), the publisher for the People Stripes® website, a mother of 5, writer, teacher (BEd, MA), depth psychologist – Jungian and archetypal studies (MA, PhD), and career coach. Parenting, teaching in a classroom, or on the ice as a figure skating coach has taught her a great deal about relationships and the importance of communication.
View full author bio | Close

Time management is a big deal in school, especially considering the incredibly busy lives so many of our kids lead. Clearly, some kids like structure, using a planner to organize their daily activities and homework assignments, and we know many who don't. Teaching kids in a way that honors their different learning styles can help everyone succeed.

READ MORE >>



PeopleStripes.org article

“My Teacher Hates Me! I Hate My Teacher!” – The Joys of a New School Year

Aug 07, 2018
Yvonne Nelson-Reid, PhD
YVONNE NELSON-REID, PhD, is the Senior Development Associate at the Center for Applications of Psychological Type (CAPT®), the publisher for the People Stripes® website, a mother of 5, writer, teacher (BEd, MA), depth psychologist – Jungian and archetypal studies (MA, PhD), and career coach. Parenting, teaching in a classroom, or on the ice as a figure skating coach has taught her a great deal about relationships and the importance of communication.
View full author bio | Close

Getting ready to meet the new teacher can add to the stress of the new year. Learning how to work through difficult situations is an important life skill, especially for young people.

READ MORE >>



PeopleStripes.org article

Persuasion Does Not Work for All Children

Apr 09, 2018
Elizabeth Murphy, EdD
ELIZABETH MURPHY, EdD, is a psychologist and type expert whose research focuses on verifying the development of normal personality differences according to the theory of psychological type. She works extensively with families and teams of people to improve communication and resolve relationship needs.
View full author bio | Close

Usually children approach school and authority figures from two different perspectives. One is a ?teacher pleaser.? They want the teacher to like them so they will more frequently do whatever the teacher asks in order to be in the teacher?s favor. The second style is a ?rule follower.? If there is a rule (a reasonable and good rule), this child is willing to comply. The first kind of child responds positively to persuasion from a teacher. The second does not. For the second child, persuasion merely suggests there are two choices.

READ MORE >>



Class Participation: Type Tip #1

Measure class participation by acquired content rather than who spoke aloud. At the end of the lesson have students, write, draw, or tell a partner three things they learned from the lesson presentation. If they can identify three pieces of content, they participated. Introverts may choose to participate by listening while extraverts may choose to participate by sharing. Letting each student participate in their best way honors differences.

Note: The skill of public expression is different than the skill of participation in a lecture or class presentation.

LINK COPIED TO CLIPBOARD